share what you’ve been given

This has been quite a year.  Lots of change.  Lots of angst.  Thankfully, much of that is past, and I am looking forward to a year of new beginnings.  In the midst of all the hand-wringing one of my biggest concerns was that I didn’t want my seven-year-old daughter to see me as a sad person.  I didn’t want her to remember a sad dad as she thought back on her childhood.  One of the books that she checked out from the library during this period was Lotsa de Casha by Madonna.  O.K., I know it’s a dippy title.  And Madonna is the last person I would have expected to write something that would affect me.  Her little story found me at a time when I was ready for what it was teaching.

In the story Mr. Lotsa de Casha has a lot of money, servants, everything he could want.   Except happiness.  He goes searching for help with his problem.  He eventually talks to a sage who tells him that if he shares what he has and puts others before himself, he will find happiness.  Unable to accept the sages’ answer, he travels on.  He finds himself traveling with and working for a man who appears to be giving away one possession after another, but is friends with everyone he meets.  When they reach Mr. Casha’s home, the man reveals that he too once had great wealth and lived in the same castle.  He tells Lotsa that if he shares with others he will not only find happiness, he will find friends.

At the time I read this story I was managing alright, but I was unhappy, and I found this unacceptable.  What was especially freeing to me about this little story was an additional truth that came to me upon reflection.  I could only share what I had; I did not have to be more than I was.  I began to realize that this was a way to build a new life and a new career.  I began to think about what I had to offer, building and growing what I had to offer, and then offering that to others.  I also believe that  everything I have has been given to me at some point.  Therefore, I’m not only sharing what I have, I’m sharing what I’ve been given.  I realize that sharing what I’ve been given is a lofty goal, but focusing on it releves the pressure to be something more than I am and makes me happy about what I might be able to do for others, including my daughter.

share what you’ve been given